Sullivan Rock to Mount Cooke

4 h to 6 h
2 h to 3 h

18 km
return

↑ 539 m
↓ -539 m

Hard track
Starting from the Sullivan Rock car park on Albany Highway, Mount Cooke, this walk takes you past Sullivan Rock to the summit of Mount Cooke and back via the Bibbulmun Track. One of the best sectional day walks in the area, this hike leads walkers from the granite formation known as Sullivan Rock to the summit of Mount Cooke, the scarp's highest peak. A campsite is located at the base of Mount Cooke, making this also a good option for an overnight walk. The hike to Mount Cooke begins with a walk right up the middle of Sullivan Rock. There are cairns alongside the track which can be used for navigation, with moss and Gnamma scattered around. Once over the rock and down amongst the jarrah trees, you'll reach the junction where the Bibbulmun Track begins. The track continues through low-lying jarrah and sheoak forest on flat ground, with the trees eventually thinning out into a swampy floodplain area. A noteworthy landmark along this stretch is an old rusty car sitting upside-down on the side of the track. The forest becomes increasingly dense and the track starts to incline slightly as it approaches the Mount Cooke Campsite. If you've decided to stay the night, you can set everything up and leave it at the campground before going for the summit walk. From the campsite, the track climbs steeply towards the summit of Mount Cooke, with some nice views to the east. After exploring the summit and enjoying the views, you can return via the same route or choose to continue following the Waugal markers and rock cairns down the southern slope of Mount Cooke. If you are lucky enough, you might even find the elusive Mount Cooke Cave and have a chance to leave a note in the 'Cave Book'. This is a relatively long and challenging walk, suitable for walkers with a moderate level of fitness and experience. The track is generally easy to follow, with the Waugal markers providing clear directional information. The terrain is mixed but the majority of the hike is quite gentle, with a few rocky sections and some manageable ascents and descents. Sullivan Rock and Mount Cooke are largely made of granite, so extra care must be taken in wet and slippery conditions. Let us begin by acknowledging the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.
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Safer Bushwalks
Tips on staying safe on track
Before you start any bushwalk ensure you;
• Tell someone you trust where you are going and what to do if you are overdue
• Have adequate equipment, supplies, skills & knowledge for the whole journey
• Consider the impact of weather forecasts, park/track closures & fire dangers
• Can respond to emergencies & call for help at any point
• Are healthy and fit enough for this journey
If not, change plans and stay safe. It is okay to delay and ask people for help.
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Getting There
Transport options and directions
Start (-32.3795234,116.2506494)
Mode Car
DirectionsFrom
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Track Notes
Turn by turn instructions & maps
Getting started
From the Sullivan Rock car park on Albany Highway, Mount Cooke, head across the road and over the makeshift bridge directly on the other side, passing a red 'Bibbulmun Track' sign (to your right). Follow the dirt trail ahead for about 150m until you reach the base of Sullivan Rock, then head up the granite formation following the cairns. Once you've made your way across Sullivan Rock, follow the trail marked with a cairn for about 130m until you reach the junction with the Bibbulmun Track, where you'll find a pair of red 'Sullivan Rock' and 'Bibbulmun Track' signs. Turn right and follow the Bibbulmun Track ahead to continue the hike to Mount Cooke.....
Turn map Directions & comments
Start.
After 350 m find the "Sullivan Rock" (60 m on your left).
Sullivan Rock
Sullivan Rock

Sullivan Rock is a massive low-lying granite monadnock, which is an isolated rock hill above a generally flat surrounding plain. The huge sheet of rock that forms Sullivan Rock is dotted with delicate islands of lichens and mosses, providing a great introduction to the natural beauty that lies ahead.
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Sullivan Rock is a massive low-lying granite monadnock, which is an isolated rock hill above a generally flat surrounding plain. The huge sheet of rock that forms Sullivan Rock is dotted with delicate islands of lichens and mosses, providing a great introduction to the natural beauty that lies ahead.

After another 335 m turn right, to head along Bibbulmun Track.
After another 390 m (at the intersection of Millars Log Road & Bibbulmun Track) turn left, to head along Millars Log Road (a vehicle track).
After another 65 m (at the intersection of Millars Log Road & Bibbulmun Track) turn right, to head along Bibbulmun Track (a footpath).
After another 1.8 km veer right, to head along Bibbulmun Track.
The starting point of an optional sidetrip. This little side trip takes you to the Mount Cooke Group Campsite. To start this optional side trip continue straight here. On returning from this side trip turn sharp right when you get back to this intersection. Details below.
After another 3.1 km veer left, to head along Bibbulmun Track.
After another 640 m find the "Mount Cooke Campsite" (10 m on your right).
Mount Cooke Campsite
Mount Cooke Campsite

This campsite features a small hut, multiple clearings for pitching tents, long drop toilet, a couple of picnic tables and a campfire, as well as two rainwater tanks to meet demand. The location of the original Mount Cooke Campsite can be seen just beyond the hut, near the boot cleaning station. Incinerated in the 2003 bushfires, the only remnant of the previous campsite is a rusty water tank still standing in the clearing. An information panel nearby provides photos of the fire sweeping up Mount Cooke.
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This campsite features a small hut, multiple clearings for pitching tents, long drop toilet, a couple of picnic tables and a campfire, as well as two rainwater tanks to meet demand. The location of the original Mount Cooke Campsite can be seen just beyond the hut, near the boot cleaning station. Incinerated in the 2003 bushfires, the only remnant of the previous campsite is a rusty water tank still standing in the clearing. An information panel nearby provides photos of the fire sweeping up Mount Cooke.

After another 2.3 km come to "Mount Cooke".
Mount Cooke
Mount Cooke

At 582m above sea level (and about 250m above the surrounding plateau), Mount Cooke is the highest granite monadnock in the Darling Range. Surrounded by many tall granite boulders, the summit is marked by a large cairn and an old metal sign. While there are some interesting plants and rocks at the summit, the views are much more impressive from the granite slabs further back and the slightly lower peaks further ahead.
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At 582m above sea level (and about 250m above the surrounding plateau), Mount Cooke is the highest granite monadnock in the Darling Range. Surrounded by many tall granite boulders, the summit is marked by a large cairn and an old metal sign. While there are some interesting plants and rocks at the summit, the views are much more impressive from the granite slabs further back and the slightly lower peaks further ahead.

Turn around here and retrace the main route for 9 km to get back to the start.

This little side trip takes you to the Mount Cooke Group Campsite.
Turn map Directions & comments
Start heading along Bibbulmun Track.
After another 85 m come to a toilet.
About 10 m past the end is "Mount Cooke Group Campsite".
Mount Cooke Group Campsite
Mount Cooke Group Campsite

Due to the popularity of this section of the Bibbulmun Track and its close proximity to Albany Highway, an additional campsite has been built for the use of school and scout groups. The group campsite is quite different in that it features a large and mostly open-sided shelter that has just a concrete floor and a roof, without any sleeping platforms. However, there are plenty of picnic benches and tent sites and toilet facilities and a campfire. Even though the group campsite is a valid place to stop for a toilet break, there is also the option of the Mount Cooke campsite, a very short distance further down the track.
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Due to the popularity of this section of the Bibbulmun Track and its close proximity to Albany Highway, an additional campsite has been built for the use of school and scout groups. The group campsite is quite different in that it features a large and mostly open-sided shelter that has just a concrete floor and a roof, without any sleeping platforms. However, there are plenty of picnic benches and tent sites and toilet facilities and a campfire. Even though the group campsite is a valid place to stop for a toilet break, there is also the option of the Mount Cooke campsite, a very short distance further down the track.

The end.
Turn around and retrace your steps back the 85 m to the main route.
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Terrain
Know the Hills, grading & facilities

Sullivan Rock to Mount Cooke


Grading
Class 4/6
Hard track
Length 18 km
Time 4 h to 6 h
Quality of track Formed track, with some branches and other obstacles (3/6)
Gradient Very steep (4/6)
Signage Directional signs along the way (3/6)
Infrastructure Limited facilities, not all cliffs are fenced (3/6)
Experience Required Moderate level of bushwalking experience recommended (4/6)
Weather Foretasted & unexpected storms and severe weather may impact on navigation and safety (4/6)

Some facilities on route
Campsite: There are 2 on route, on average they are 6 km apart with the largest gap of 11.3 km.

Toilet: There is one 6 km (plus an extra 85 m along side route) from the start.


Order of key facilities on route
ItemFrom StartName & link to notes
Toilet
6 km[toilet]
Campsite
6 kmMount Cooke Group Campsite
Campsite
6.6 kmMount Cooke Campsite
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